Posts Tagged ‘Hardware’

10 ways to avoid dodge linux hardware issues from TechRepublic

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

TechRepublic.com has recently published a good read on how prevent linux hardware issues.

1) Don’t use very old or cutting-edge hardware

2) Verify support

3) Use proprietary drivers

4) Know your log files

Read the rest of the 10 ways and the details here! <——

Detect monitoring voltage, temperature, fan-rpm sensor values with linux lm-sensors!

Friday, January 15th, 2010

What is lm_sensors?

By Wikipedia’s definition of lm_sensors :

lm_sensors (Linux-monitoring sensors), a free open source software-tool for Linux, provides tools and drivers for monitoring temperatures, voltage, and fans. It also monitors chassis intrusion detection.

lm-sensors is already included in many popular linux distribution repositories.

For Gnome desktop users, values obtained from the lm_sensors can be placed in the “top panel” by installing “sensors-applet”.

Here is a good “lm-sensors” guide for Ubuntu users to add lm-sensors to your customized installation [ for both Gnome and KDE users ]

For those with bleeding edge hardware, the usual repositories lm-sensors package may not yet support all the latest sensors on their mainboards and graphics card.
However, there has been some new developments in the detection of new yet to be supported sensors that can be installed with a simple script.

More on this lm-sensors update here from Phoronix.

Source: Phoronix

via LM_Sensors Gets A New Configuration Utility.

Noob Introduction to Kernel Mode Settings and Rootless X-Server

Friday, July 24th, 2009

In the past 2 months, there has been much hype over Kernel Mode Settings (KMS) and Rootless X-Server. The inclusion of KMS into kernel version 2.6.29 is one of the major move towards KMS for enabling Rootless X-Server with various graphics hardware.

So what is KMS and Rootless X-Server and why the average linux user should be concerned?

KMS addresses the handling of video hardware which in turn displays the nice graphical user interface to the user. As its name suggests, means the kernel will set up the display’s resolution and depth mode (eg 800×600x32bits).

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Tiny Little Linux MID, SmartQ5

Wednesday, July 8th, 2009

The reason why netbooks are increasing in its demand is because users are starting to prefer smaller and lighter notebooks to carry around.

There is another range of devices that is rising in popularity, probably not here in Singapore. But its presence can already be felt. The Mobile Internet Devices, aka MID, are handheld computers built around mobile processors such as the Atom or ARM CPU. It will usually have a 5 to 7 inch LCD touchscreen and can function somewhat like a PC.

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